Ghost BRK Ghost Review

Franklink

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I've been working with the Ghost for 10+ months now, many, many miles covered and documented elsewhere. I've thus far shot it as a .177, .22, and more recently a .20.

This is a report of my most recent Ghost shooting session, testing out the new NSA .20/18.9gr slugs.

My slug order arrived yesterday, NIck is always great about getting them out quickly. I think I only submitted that order on Mon or Tues, so 3-4 days and they were in my mailbox. Not bad.

As an introduction to this little bit of slug testing from the Ghost, I want to state that I am not a big proponent of slugs. I've just had too many poor results from them to be very slug gung-ho. And that's from lots of quality barrels from lots of high-end airguns. The best barrel/slug/gun combination I've seen yet was the 34grain Varmint Knockers at 1000fps, from a Derrick Wall tuned Vulcan 3. And that was the best by a WIDE margin. I currently hold the slug record at a XFT @ PRGC match, and I used that V3 to do it. All the other slugs I've tested have been thoroughly unimpressive. A couple were "okay" but nothing to get very excited about. So, anytime I go into testing slugs from a new gun/barrel, I do so pretty skeptically.

I also want to state that I buy my own ammo.

With that out of the way...
A couple years ago there was talk here the forums that NSA had sent out some prototype .20 slugs to Scott S. for some beta testing. Having tooted the .20 horn for 5 or 6 years now, I was pretty excited about the prospect of some .20 slugs, but Scott reported that accuracy from those beta slugs was pretty ho-hum, and the idea seemed to die there. Fast forward a couple years and Nick announced that .20 slugs were now available for sale. From memory, this seems like it's just been a few months. With my glass-half empty feelings on slugs, I wasn't too crazy about buying some, instead hoping somebody else would do some testing on them. Well, I haven't seen many reports on how they do, so I ordered some earlier this week.

And last night I shot some, of those 18.9grain .20 NSA slugs, 116 to be exact. And I'm going to report on all 116 shots.
PXL_20230630_015103277.jpg


I did lube them up, pretty liberally, with Gunzilla. One of my gripes with slugs is how they're so bad about leading up barrels. The Gunzilla has seemed to help in both reducing the leading, as well as making it easier to clean once the inevitable required barrel scrub arrives.

As a recap, I'm using the lighter OEM hammer spring and the skeletonized lighter hammer that came in the Ghost when it shipped as a .177 Ghost Carbine. Reg pressure at 140 bar. This tune puts out the 13.73gr JSBs @ 805fps and at "11" on the wheel, shoots the 15.89grain JSBs at 910-915fps. The only adjustment I made for the .20 slug testing was the hammer tension wheel.

1st shot with the .20 slugs = 584 (wheel on "MIN")
Cranked the wheel to max and took ten more shots, again just over the chrono into pellet trap in the garage. Those ten had an average speed of 870.5fps, with a 15.7fps extreme spread. Decided at this point to shoot them on paper so moved it all outside. The rest of the 116 shots were all at at average speed of 870fps.

Set up paper at 31 yards and 53 yards. The circles I'm using as aim points are 1 and 3/8" across. No hold-offs for wind on any of the accuracy assessment shots. I guessed winds were around 10mph but nearest weather station recorded sustained winds at 13-17mph and gusts up to 28mph during the 600-700 pm shooting session. I don't think I had that much at my house, but definitely had some wind.

The next 20 shots were all at 31 yards, and consist of 4x5 shot groups. Impact point a bit high for the scope zero, accounted for that on the second pair of 5 shot groups. Thought to myself that this was looking promising at this point.
PXL_20230630_160500813.jpg


Then shot another 45 shots at 53 yards, making 9, 5shot groups. Impact still a bit high, even at 53 yards-so first shot (upper left) was high still, accounted for that with hold-under for the other 8, 5 shot groups. There are some 5 shot groups under 0.4inches here, but also some groups that got away from me a bit.
PXL_20230630_160523426.jpg


At this point I refilled the gun. I had started with a full 250 bar fill and I was at 170 bar after those 66 shots. With reg at 140 bar, guessing there would be another 25 or so shots above reg pressure. So call it 95-100 shots at 32fpe with the .20/18.9grain slugs.

Ghost is aired back up now....placed a pellet trap at 94 yards and shot 8, 5 shot groups. FIrst shot hit a bit low as my guestimate for elevation was off some (upper left, circled group). Cranked in another couple clicks and shot the rest of the 40 shots shown here.
PXL_20230630_160543897.jpg


As i shot through those 40, I got pretty excited. 4 of the 8 are better than moa. And no hold off for the wind! In fact, results were good enough that i used the 5 best groups, superimposed over an EBR target to get a frame of reference for how these .20 slugs are shooting. (yes, cherry picking but keep in mind there are no sighters, nor wind flags, nor holding off for wind, etc,).
PXL_20230630_161007370.jpg


As for the Ghost felt to shoot those slugs? Very calm demeanor with this tune. Im sure I could get them rocking much faster, but with as good as they shot (accuracy) at 870, I don't think I want to. In addition, I'm getting 3 not only usable, but very accurate "tunes'from the current configuration. By simply turning the hammer wheel. "MIN" = 805 with 13.73gr pellets, "11" = 910-915 with 15.89gr pellets, and "MAX" = 970 with 18.9grain slugs. Also, Ghost was still fairly quite, even without a moderator on the end of the shroud. Some of that can be attributed to the 19.5 inch barrel in a shroud meant to fit a 23 inch barrel (lots of dead space in the shroud).

And that makes another point, I've seen lots of complaints about the Ghost power wheel not doing much. I've responded multiple times that it's all about the "tune." I'll point out here that at "min" the 18.9grain slugs are going 584 and at "max" they're going 870fps. That's a 286fps difference, or put another way, 14pfe, all the way up to 32 fpe, and only by spinning the power wheel. It IS possible to have a large difference with the hammer tension wheel in the Ghost, when the available settings are adjusted to allow that.

So, before I even walked down range and retrieved paper and measured groups, and even before I put the gun/etc away, i jumped on my phone and ordered a bunch more 18.9grain NSA slugs. In fact, the biggest order I've ever placed with NSA got made while I was still sitting at my little folding table "bench" yesterday evening.

I hope to find some time to measure the ballistic coefficient of these .20/18.9grain NSAs, and of course I'll share that here.

Finally, the accuracy I saw last evening was good enough to be competitive at Xtreme Field Target. I mentioned a few posts ago that I'd like to get my hands on a 700mm .22 kit to try out the Altaros 32grain slugs at an XFT match, but after pricing the Altaros out, and seeing how good the .20 NSAs are shooting, my enthusiasm is dampened a bit there. (Those particular Altaros slugs look to be about 3x the cost of the .20 NSAs).

Regardless, Nick @nielsenammo, PLEASE continue making the .20/18.9grain slugs.
 
Today I measured the BC of the three .20 projectiles I've been shooting from the Ghost. Crazy high from the slugs! Will get it shared shortly.
 
Today I measured the BC of the 18.9 grain .20 slugs recently released from NSA.

Gun used = BRK Ghost. Barrel is a 12 land and groove Lothar with slight choke.
Temps were around 90 degrees.
Elevation of almost 5700 feet above sea level.


10 shot average at muzzle:
Lo -875.5
Hi -893.6
Ave-882.3
ES- 18

15 shot average @ 59 yards
Lo-800.1
Hi-813.5
Ave-809
ES- 13.4

Screenshot_20230701-201032.png

Screenshot_20230701-201058.png


Really high BC. Eye brow raising high actually.

But, actual impact points are matching Strelok predicted, at least out to the 170 yards that I shot today, and that's using 0.09 as the BC in Strelok.

NSA listed 0.078 as the BC for these slugs. My data shows up around 0.09. ES on both the muzzle and 59 yard data samples are relatively tight. I also measured the BCs of the JSB 13.73 and 15.89 pellets today (same testing equipment and conditions) and they were right in line with what I've measured from them before. I've analyzed the data and pondered over what I could be doing wrong to have gotten such a high BC from the .20/18.9 grain slugs and can't see anything obvious. The fact that the poi is matching Strelok predicted, while using such a high BC is promising and suggests that the BC is truly that high. But, I'm open to any suggestions on something I may be missing as to why it was measured as so surprisingly high today.

Hit 3 Euro doves while shooting today, closest was 115yards. None were dead on impact so seems to be ice-picking them. Which when pesting, dead eventually is still dead.

Here are the 15 shots @59 yards used for the average speed at that distance.
PXL_20230702_032638242.jpg


And some groups @ 135 yards. Not amazing, but wind had picked up by the time I got around to shooting that far out.
PXL_20230702_052948366.jpg


I shot some .22 MRDs in the same winds, also to 135 yards and it was a shotgun. They acted like wadcutters when compared to how the .20 slugs were doing. Much more vertical dispersion versus primarily horizontal dispersion like I was seeing with the slugs.
PXL_20230702_053031691.jpg


Pretty excited for these .20 slugs. They're my current best long range option.
 
Really rare for a pigeon to test his luck in my back pasture ....BUT one landed about 30 minutes ago. A mad dash for the Ghost ensued, and the pigeon actually Sat there long enough for me to get the gun, slide open the gun turret window on the second floor, annnnnnddddd POP him!

I guessed his range @ 60 yards and just held dead-on, since that's the zero for the JSB .20/15.89 @ 915.

He was broadside, my least favorite way to shoot at a thick winged bird like a pigeon or Euro. And that's because it often results in a broken wing and a wounded bird when not using pretty big fpe. But I hoped I could slip the pellet in at the base of the neck, above the wing juncture. Took the shot and he dropped, dead as a doornail.

Upon retrieval I found the pellet hit about 1/2 to 3/4 inch lower than I wanted, and went straight through the thickest wing joint. It continued on through the upper breast, and there's blood on the far side as well, so it went clean through him, even though it hit that wing joint on entering. That slightly lower than intended impact point means he was probably more like 70 yards.

Ghost was ready to go, no sight-in necessary. Last time I shot it was Saturday. Just grabbed it, took the shot and dead pigeon. That's been the experience for the last ten months, completely reliable and always-retained scope zero.

Add a nice big pigeon to the Ghost .20s tally.
PXL_20230704_184312734.jpg
 
Today I measured the BC of the 18.9 grain .20 slugs recently released from NSA.

Gun used = BRK Ghost. Barrel is a 12 land and groove Lothar with slight choke.
Temps were around 90 degrees.
Elevation of almost 5700 feet above sea level.


10 shot average at muzzle:
Lo -875.5
Hi -893.6
Ave-882.3
ES- 18

15 shot average @ 59 yards
Lo-800.1
Hi-813.5
Ave-809
ES- 13.4

Screenshot_20230701-201032.png

Screenshot_20230701-201058.png


Really high BC. Eye brow raising high actually.

But, actual impact points are matching Strelok predicted, at least out to the 170 yards that I shot today, and that's using 0.09 as the BC in Strelok.

NSA listed 0.078 as the BC for these slugs. My data shows up around 0.09. ES on both the muzzle and 59 yard data samples are relatively tight. I also measured the BCs of the JSB 13.73 and 15.89 pellets today (same testing equipment and conditions) and they were right in line with what I've measured from them before. I've analyzed the data and pondered over what I could be doing wrong to have gotten such a high BC from the .20/18.9 grain slugs and can't see anything obvious. The fact that the poi is matching Strelok predicted, while using such a high BC is promising and suggests that the BC is truly that high. But, I'm open to any suggestions on something I may be missing as to why it was measured as so surprisingly high today.

Hit 3 Euro doves while shooting today, closest was 115yards. None were dead on impact so seems to be ice-picking them. Which when pesting, dead eventually is still dead.

Here are the 15 shots @59 yards used for the average speed at that distance.
PXL_20230702_032638242.jpg


And some groups @ 135 yards. Not amazing, but wind had picked up by the time I got around to shooting that far out.
PXL_20230702_052948366.jpg


I shot some .22 MRDs in the same winds, also to 135 yards and it was a shotgun. They acted like wadcutters when compared to how the .20 slugs were doing. Much more vertical dispersion versus primarily horizontal dispersion like I was seeing with the slugs.
PXL_20230702_053031691.jpg


Pretty excited for these .20 slugs. They're my current best long range option.
Frank link, thank you very much for your review! Great results and very well written, too 😀
 
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Ghost .20 served me well today. We had 17 shooters over at the Southwest Airgunners field target match in Western NM, and I believe 16 of us were shooting Hunter class. I tied for first with a 58. Match director chose to break the tie with shoot off, which consisted of 5 chickens @ 55 yards (1/5 scale silhouette) for each of us. 1 minute to knock em down, 1 shot per chicken. I hit my first four, missed the fifth, finished with about 20 seconds to spare. The other 58 score shooter missed his third and ran out of time for his fifth shot so the tie went to me. Very difficult course, 60 shot match and it's really hard not to make a mental mistake somewhere in that many shots. Ie, doing everything right 60 times in a row is VERY difficult.4 targets past 51 yards. Really challenging, but really enjoyable day.

One of my two misses was a misranged shot where I initially ranged it at about 22-23 yards. Pellet strike at 6 o'clock on the rim of the kill zone. Reranged and realized it was more like 19 yards so got it on the second shot. The other miss was me holding for wind on a 54-55 yard shot, and pellet striking right at 3 o'clock where I was holding. Just held straight on for the second shot and the target fell. User error on both misses.

Ghost .20 is turning into a great field target gun!!!
 
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Prairie Dog Busting with Ghosts X3

I met Tony and Barbara a couple years ago through Xtreme Field Target events at Phoenix Rod and Gun Club. (yes, Tony is married to THAT Barb, the one with the fancy red Ghost)

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Sometime in the past 8 or 10 months Tony inquired about pesting opportunities here in Arizona. He and Barb had recently moved from Cali and he was having withdrawals from the ground squirrel shooting that he enjoyed while he lived there. At the time I explained that ground squirrels in my slice of heaven are few and far between, but that in the summer months, some decent prairie dog pesting opportunities are available. The pdogs around me are Gunnison's prairie dogs, and in about 2008 the AZ Game and Fish decided to close down the hunting season for a few months in the spring to give them a chance to reproduce. So, season opens on July 1st, and runs until March 31st. And at my elevation, about half of that season is a moot point, because they hibernate once it starts freezing at night, usually mid October. So, combining state regs and habits of local Gunnisons populations equates to an effective/legal season from July 1st to about the first week of October.

After getting back from the recent field target event over in New Mexico this past weekend, I realized that I was off work yesterday. Scheduled day off + the above described pdog situation+minimal ground cover right now+my wife being due to deliver our daughter in the next few weeks = perfect opportunity to invite Tony up for a day of pdog pesting. I was afraid if we put it off any longer we'd maybe not get to squeeze it in this year, with the new baby and all. Despite the short notice, Tony was able to rearrange a prior commitment.

Tony posed a few questions about what to expect, and I could tell he was trying to settle on a gun/guns that would fit the situation best. I told him expect shots from 10 yards to as far as you're willing to attempt a shot, and that some of my "permissions" (as the Brits say) would require low power, while others would be safe to use unlimited fpe, and even slugs, if we so desired. He settled on his .22 Ghost Carbine, and his .30 Ghost HP. With the review Ghost being my current best long range option, as well as the only bottle gun (shot count) readily available to me, I also chose to campaign a Ghost, using the .20 barrel.

So we ended up with 3 Ghosts on the hunt. I found it interesting that it played out that way. This wasn't a sponsored hunt, nor was it a promo event for the Ghost. In fact, it was a simple as 2 guys who enjoy airguns choosing to use the gun(s) they each thought was most appropriate for the situation. And we both chose Ghosts. It was a bit of a "hmmmm, yep" moment for me.

Tony arrived early enough for us to get a good early start to the day. The first permission we hit is less than 1 mile from my house. It's an arid area next to some irrigated pasture land. The dogs don't like to be flooded out so they set up shop as close to the irrigated land as possible, but keeping their holes outside of the irrigated land. This results in the fencelines being destroyed by their burrowing, and in this case, the north side of the field doesn't get as much water so they've established their burrows in the drier part of the field. There are three houses right there next to the pdog infested field and this was where we needed to use the low power stuff, as the closest house is only about 75 yards from the main area we were shooting the dogs in. I'm an acquaintance to all three homes (two of the homes are lived in by the families of two brothers, and the third is the family of one of the brother's grandsons) and I have permission to shoot here.

Tony utilized his .22 Ghost Carbine first, shooting the 18.1grain JSBs at 880 if I remember correctly. I chose the .20/15.89 at about 915. Both of us were right around 30fpe. We stayed there for an hour or so, killing probably 30-40 dogs in that field. I was mostly spotting and range-finding, but there was enough action that I simply couldn't resist shooting too. Most of these were taken from 50-75 yards, but there were a couple on the far side of the dog town that were taken at 95-110 yards. We even had a surprise guest from a guy out for his morning walk. He lives about 1/4 mile from where we were shooting. He announced his presence with, "what are you doing?" in a somewhat gruff manner. My initial thought was that we were going to have a tree hugging hippy experience, with somebody angry that we were out killing cute little animals. But I couldn't have been more wrong. I responded simply and factually, "we're shooting prairie dogs" as I gestured out to the field where they were scurrying around. He seemed to soften at that, and proceeded to tell us how a pdog had gotten into his garage (there are a bunch in the land that borders his subdivision, I've never tried to shoot them there b/c of all the houses and that I'd need to talk to a whole neighborhood to get the green light to do so). So he explains how he's got a springer and tries to shoot them. He asked a couple details about the guns we were using and how well they worked for the task, etc. The conversation wound down and he continued on his walk, calling over his shoulder, "carry on guys." And that we did, shooting until the action slowed down.

From there we moved on to the honey hole. A few years ago I pulled into a small little alfalfa operation (I'd guess maybe 20-30 acres, spread out over a bunch of small fields), with the goal of talking to the guy who I know farms it. Living in a small town, we knew each other previously, and he told me to get as many as I could, with open invitation to return and do the same as often as I want. So I've killed hundreds of them from those fields and the surrounding area in the last couple years, and the ground still crawls with them. Like I said, I consider it the honey hole. That alfalfa must up the pdog reproduction rate or something, cuz I just can't get ahead of them there. So that's where Tony and I headed next. Depending on the direction of shots, and ever changing location of the farm hands, this spot mostly is power unlimited. Tony pulled out the .30 Ghost, using the JSB 44grainers. I spun the power wheel on the Ghost .20 and switched to the new NSA 18.9grain slugs. The first couple shots I took were in the 175-188 range, with the 188 yarder being the furthest I can remember connecting on. Initially I worked on the further ones and Tony busted the 100-135 yarders. He had 3 or 4 dead dogs within the same 20 yard circle at about 115 yards out within the first 5 or 6 shots. Man o man, when that .30 hits em it sounds like somebody dropped a cinder block on a water balloon! POP!!! He was able to get much cleaner kills with the .30 than I could with the .20 slugs. Through the day we concluded that the .20 slugs were just ice-picking them. I could connect on them as far out as I wanted, but unless it was a head shot it simply wasn't anchoring them. Even a good vital shot from the .20 slugs and they'd walk around for a minute before keeling over dead. It was killing them, humanely even (at least as humanely as a broad-head shot to the vitals of a whitetail deer), it just wasn't splattering them like the .30. One of the reasons I consider this the pdog honey hole is because, again they like to live in the unirrigated margins around the fields, and when it's early in the season like yesterday, there isn't much ground cover for them to hide in. So it's LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS of shooting. We moved around a couple times in the fields, and ultimately lost count of how many we'd gotten. After a couple hours we decided it was lunch time and headed into town for a sit down at the local Mexican food restaurant.

After lunch we went to check out my latest "permission." This one was acquired just last week, through a cousin, also a farmer. The cousin told me about a farmer on the far end of town, who was complaining about his prairie dog problem. Cousin asked if I'd like to get after them so I met up with cousin and landowner/farmer on Monday. Farmer was excited at the prospect and guided me to the highest density of pdogs. He doesn't live on the property but happened to be there when Tony and I pulled up yesterday. I introduced them and he was interested in our guns and was generally pretty chatty. Once we were able to move on to the task at hand, this turned out to be a bit different situation than the other permissions, as his irrigated fields border the small creek that runs through the area. The pdogs were primarily out in the grass versus in the foliage free margins like the other areas, and the grass was deep enough for them to disappear in, unless they were standing up. Really pretty little area, more secluded than the others, with boulder strewn bluffs on the far side of the creek, creating an effective and safe backstop. The main concern for downrange safety here were some horses and a donkey. They were sort of like the farmhands at the previous location, constantly changing location. So we just made sure not to take shots when them in the background. Tony was running low on .30 pellets so chose to wield the .22 Ghost again. I went back and forth between the .20/15.89 pellets and the .20/18.9grain slugs, depending on how far out I was taking shots. The first 6 or 8 we took here were either offhand or kneeling, but we quickly regrouped and went back to using fenceposts or whatever other support was readily available. The average distance for the shots at this creek location was probably around 80-100 yards, and the wind had come up by now so we had to factor that in as well. Tony had no trouble connecting, but I must admit that when we spotted one on a hill at 115, and noting the stiff crosswind, I was skeptical. I gave him the lasered distance, and he drilled that dog!!! No sighter, no walking it in like we were needing to do at times, just a huge hold off for the wind, muffled sound of the Ghost being fired, and dog slumped over and rolled off his hill, literal DRT. Had to have been a head shot for it to drop the way it did. We concluded that was Tony's new record for distance with his .22 Ghost. Pretty impressive for 30 fpe with 18.1grain pellets.

By now it was around 3pm. We decided to head back to the honey hole for another quick session before Tony needed to drive home. Arriving back at the honey hole and using the number of them that were running around as a guide, you'd never guess that we'd probably killed 50-75 there that morning. We shot another 50 or so before we called it a day. After we'd put the guns away the dogs were still running in every direction as we headed out of the property.

It's really hard to keep count but a reasonable estimate was that we EACH probably got around 100 pdogs. All three Ghost's functioned flawlessly, requiring no further maintenance than air and pellets/slugs. That's how this airgunning thing is supposed to work, no chasing impact points or tinkering and tuning, just simple and trouble-free enjoyment.

It was a great day. We were having too much fun to even stop and take a picture, so no photo to share here in the write-up.
 
Another great write up, Franklin 👍🙂 Sounds like you had a great day on the p dogs with the Ghosts 🎯 I met Tony and Barbara at EBR 2022 - Really nice people for sure 🙂
You and I sorta met there as well Soren. We were both in the tent waiting for our turn on the American Field Target course at the same time. I was talking to Bobby and Sandy and then Michael a bit, and then got called to shoot the course so never had a chance to introduce myself.
 
Just had a little post-work/de-stress session with the Ghost shooting .20 slugs. Paper at 100 yards. Only took 55 shots before I ran out of daylight. Wind easily 10-12mph. First 15 or so were just impact verification/sighters. Then shot an EBR card. Then moved back to the sighter paper and shot a couple more five shot groups, and finally ended with a 10 shot group.

The first 4 shots were touching.
The EBR card scores a 224.
The 10 shot group is 1.75" ctc.
No hold-offs for wind.

55 shots and starting pressure was 250 bar, ending pressure was 180 bar.

I'm really impressed with the NSA .20/18.9grain slugs outta the Ghost. It's not using much air, it's still fun to shoot (not harsh like the big fpe Airguns), and above all, VERY accurate. I like low power airguns. These .20 slugs @ 30fpe from the Ghost are exactly what I've been looking for for quite a while. High shot count, still relatively safe, not loud, not expensive to shoot, and they go where I want them to go, even at really long (for an airgun) ranges.

Maybe it's just my perception, but for quite a while theres been a general feeling in the industry that low power/low weight projectiles just can't perform at long ranges. And for a long time I've felt like I needed to buy a .25 or .30 cannon if I wanted to really reach out there. But I don't like how much air the bigger calibers burn through, and I don't like the recoil from shooting them. The Ghost and the .20 slugs being shot from it are a breath of fresh air.
 
Cole thanks for a great day!!!!! It was worth the 3 hour drive each way to go P dog hunting with you.

Cole is being modest because his longest shot with the 20 ghost using slugs was ranged at 203 by me. I ranged the distance twice and what a great shot it was......My longest was 185 with the 30 planting the Pdog right where it was.

At times I couldn't keep magazines loaded and had to stop shooting to reload them. Cole was shooting single shot which I almost changed to, but I remembered I had a midwest magazine for the 22 ghost and the 30 ghost in the bag.

Refilled my air, loaded up the 3 factory 30 cal magazine I had and the midwest magazine. I can usually get 4 magazines out of the 30 cal before I want to re-air. Well I shot the 3 factory mags first and put the Midwest in and continued to shoot. I forgot all about airing up and went through the midwest magazine also. (These were all shots around 50-60 yards) After I had finished emptying all the magazines I looked at my air.....I had been off the reg for a long time because I had 100 bar on the air bottle gauge.....Yeah too much fun to even think about airing up.

My most trusted hunting rifle has been Headbager (Crown 380mm in 22), but Buster (22 carbine) is right up there with it. For tight spaces and ease of cocking, Buster is at the top now. Headbanger is right handed cocking only and Buster I switched over to left handed and for me that is easier for hunting.

Thanks again Cole for a great day!!!

Man do I like the schwack sound on a good shot, it just puts a smile on your face 😀

Tony P.
 
Just had a little post-work/de-stress session with the Ghost shooting .20 slugs. Paper at 100 yards. Only took 55 shots before I ran out of daylight. Wind easily 10-12mph. First 15 or so were just impact verification/sighters. Then shot an EBR card. Then moved back to the sighter paper and shot a couple more five shot groups, and finally ended with a 10 shot group.

The first 4 shots were touching.
The EBR card scores a 224.
The 10 shot group is 1.75" ctc.
No hold-offs for wind.

55 shots and starting pressure was 250 bar, ending pressure was 180 bar.

I'm really impressed with the NSA .20/18.9grain slugs outta the Ghost. It's not using much air, it's still fun to shoot (not harsh like the big fpe Airguns), and above all, VERY accurate. I like low power airguns. These .20 slugs @ 30fpe from the Ghost are exactly what I've been looking for for quite a while. High shot count, still relatively safe, not loud, not expensive to shoot, and they go where I want them to go, even at really long (for an airgun) ranges.

Maybe it's just my perception, but for quite a while theres been a general feeling in the industry that low power/low weight projectiles just can't perform at long ranges. And for a long time I've felt like I needed to buy a .25 or .30 cannon if I wanted to really reach out there. But I don't like how much air the bigger calibers burn through, and I don't like the recoil from shooting them. The Ghost and the .20 slugs being shot from it are a breath of fresh air.
Ok sounds like it’s right up my alley! Now you have to do me a big favor and get the powers that be to make some 20 barrels for the ghost so i can get 1 !!
 
Ok sounds like it’s right up my alley! Now you have to do me a big favor and get the powers that be to make some 20 barrels for the ghost so i can get 1 !!
There was a guy on Instagram last week or so, also lobbying for a factory .20 Ghost option to be made available for purchase.

The necessary players monitor the forums and social media. I can guarantee that these requests are being seen.

Whether they think there's a break-even point ($$$) worth follow through is beyond my purview.
 
There was a guy on Instagram last week or so, also lobbying for a factory .20 Ghost option to be made available for purchase.

The necessary players monitor the forums and social media. I can guarantee that these requests are being seen.

Whether they think there's a break-even point ($$$) worth follow through is beyond my purview.
You are correct unfortunately for us they probably won’t since they can do basically the same with 177 and 16 grainers. Too bad
 

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